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JANE BURGERMEISTER REPORT: ‘Greece crisis: Revolution in the offing? asks BBC’

Greece crisis: Revolution in the offing? asks BBC

Gavin Hewitt, BBC

For more than three weeks protesters have occupied the square opposite the Greek parliament. They have pitched their blue and grey tents and hung their slogans from the orange trees.

“We got the solution. Revolution,” declares one poster. “Rise up people of the world,” urges another.

Read more at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-13830466

Greece crisis: Revolution in the offing?

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A protester of the Greek Communist party shouts slogans during a rally in Athens on 18 June

For more than three weeks protesters have occupied the square opposite the Greek parliament. They have pitched their blue and grey tents and hung their slogans from the orange trees.

“We got the solution. Revolution,” declares one poster. “Rise up people of the world,” urges another.

Inspired by the Arab uprisings, they have dug in to oppose further spending cuts in exchange for a second bail-out by the EU and IMF.

The encampment, however, hardly crackles with revolutionary fervour. It has the feel of an anti-globalisation village, nestled in amongst Africans selling handbag copies and bright-rimmed sunglasses.

The Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou is depicted as riding the CIA/IMF plane. He is portrayed as a capitalist stooge.

“Start Quote

The mood is tinder dry. A city at a tipping point”

The activists bicker amongst themselves about real democracy.

“We have no leaders here,” said one proudly. They go into contortions about interviews in case by speaking out it is judged as assuming a leadership role.

No zeal

There are references to the revolutions of 1789 and 1848 and La Commune. But amongst the hammocks and tables there is no agreed agenda. If there is a unifying theme, it is hatred of the bankers and international capitalism.

They are indignant but they lack the will, the determination, the message, the zeal to shake Athens.

“Start Quote

No-one knows what this generation will do with their anger”

What they do do is to serve as a rallying point. In the cool of the evenings families bring their children here. They are a magnet for those who feel bitter and let down.

The latest poll suggests that 47% of Greeks oppose the latest package cuts as demanded by European paymasters and the IMF.

But more dangerous than the activists is the mood of ordinary people. They are despondent. As academic Yannis Varoufakis told me “above all they resent the loss of dignity”.

They dislike the bail-outs. It eats away at their pride.

Prime Minister George Papandreou addresses a session of the parliament in Athens on 19 June Papandreou may win his confidence vote, but has a divided country to run

They no longer know who to believe. They were told last year that short-term pain would deliver results. It hasn’t. The German Chancellor Angela Merkel says Greece has “cut new borrowing by 5%. Remarkable savings but not enough”.

All many Greeks see is rising national debt and unemployment.

The mood is tinder dry. A city at a tipping point. Power workers are about to go on strike threatening power cuts amidst the stifling heat of summer.

Despondent

I went to Piraeus to visit a family. Roula, the mother, is threatened with losing her job. She says finding another, at her age, is all but impossible. The young are leaving. “This will be a country of old people,” she says.

Her daughter Barbara, 23, is thinking of emigrating much as young people are in Ireland and Spain.

This is the real crisis in the eurozone. A young generation lost, without work. The figures are staggering.

In Spain unemployment for 16 to 24 year olds is running at 43%. In Italy it is more than 25%. In Europe millions of highly educated young people are being denied the opportunity of working.

Protester in Athens on 18 June Unemployment is the real threat to the eurozone

The eurozone has proved a terrible trap for so many countries. The low interest rates, the easy money led to property booms, speculation, and piles of debt. Reducing the debt is now exacting a terrible toll on a generation.

In Spain they called themselves the “indignants” but no-one knows what this generation will do with their anger.

George Papandreou, opening a debate on a vote of confidence, has called for “national accord”. He said cash reserves would soon be exhausted. The image of national division was not helping the country survive. He offered a referendum in September on a new constitution that would make it easier to pursue corrupt officials.

He will probably win the vote of confidence on Tuesday. The week after, parliament will vote on the austerity package.

That will be a tense moment, with the risk of further violence. Even if there is another bail-out of around 110bn euros, Greeks have lost faith in the plan. All they see is debt piling on debt.

This is where the danger lies. A creeping despair. Injured national pride. Ten years of austerity.

Even so the bet must be that the Greeks reluctantly, sullenly, will go along with new austerity but I have sensed a despair that last year just wasn’t there and no-one knows where that will lead.

June 21, 2011 Posted by | Fighting corruption internationally, Internationally significant information, Jane Burgermeister Report | Leave a comment

JANE BURGERMEISTER REPORT: ‘100,000 people march in Spain demanding real democracy’

100,000 people march in Spain demanding real democracy

Spanish reformists stage rallies in 60 cities

By SINIKKA TARVAINEN
dpa

Published: Sunday, Jun. 19, 2011 – 1:00 am

MADRID — MADRID-Tens of thousands of Spaniards demonstrated Sunday around the country, blaming the country’s economic crisis on politicians and bankers, and demanding democratic reforms.

Rallies were held in about 60 cities. Police and officials put the number of demonstrators at nearly 40,000 in Madrid, 20,000 in Barcelona, 18,000 in Granada, and several thousand in Valencia, Seville and Bilbao. No violence was reported.

Read more: http://www.sacbee.com/2011/06/19/3711963/spanish-reformists-stage-rallies.html#ixzz1PpRXX7fR

June 21, 2011 Posted by | Fighting corruption internationally, Internationally significant information, Jane Burgermeister Report | Leave a comment

JANE BURGERMEISTER REPORT: ‘German coalition government rebels against Merkel-Sarkozy Greek debt plan and its leniency on banks’

German coalition government rebels against Merkel-Sarkozy Greek debt plan and its leniency on banks

 JUNE 18, 2011, 1:33 P.M. ET

German Coalition Critiques Merkel-Sarkozy Greece Plan -Report

FRANKFURT (Dow Jones)–German coalition government leaders have criticized plans for a voluntary Greek debt rollover agreed to by German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Nicolas Sarkozy, arguing that the plan falls short of a full-scale debt restructuring favored by Berlin, German news magazine Der Spiegel reported Saturday.

“This isn’t the private sector participation that the German Bundestag pushed for,” said Frank Schaeffler, a member of the FDP Free Democratic Party.

Read more at: http://online.wsj.com/article/BT-CO-20110618-702530.html

June 21, 2011 Posted by | Fighting corruption internationally, Internationally significant information, Jane Burgermeister Report | Leave a comment

JANE BURGERMEISTER REPORT: ‘Euro Area May Break Up by 2013 on Bailout Strains, CEBR Says’

Euro Area May Break Up by 2013 on Bailout Strains, CEBR Says

Sunday, June 19, 2011

June 20 (Bloomberg) — The euro area is on course to break up as member nations’ willingness to continue bailouts for the region’s indebted countries dissipates, the Centre for Economics and Business research said in a research note.

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/g/a/2011/06/19/bloomberg1376-LMXYA20YHQ0X01-3VF67JI15BL0PJA8INI84TR86P.DTL#ixzz1PpT4Hr4c

June 21, 2011 Posted by | Fighting corruption internationally, Internationally significant information, Jane Burgermeister Report | Leave a comment

JANE BURGERMEISTER REPORT: ‘Boris Johnson: Let Greece default on its debts and leave the euro’

Boris Johnson: Let Greece default on its debts and leave the euro

Britain will NOT be part of bailout, says Downing Street

Single currency is responsible for ‘exacerbating’ the international financial crisis, says London Mayor

In Spain thousands have flooded the streets blaming bankers and politicians for painful spending cuts

By Daniel Martin

Last updated at 3:21 PM on 20th June 2011

Boris Johnson said Britain should refuse to contribute to another bailout of Greece

Greece should be allowed to default on its debts and leave the euro, according to London Mayor Boris Johnson.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2005499/Boris-Johnson-Let-Greece-default-debts-leave-euro.html#ixzz1PpSdPXlT

June 21, 2011 Posted by | Fighting corruption internationally, Internationally significant information, Jane Burgermeister Report | Leave a comment

JANE BURGERMEISTER REPORT: ‘Britain ‘won’t bail out Greece again’ says Downing Street’

Britain ‘won’t bail out Greece again’ says Downing Street

Britain ‘won’t bail out Greece again’ says Downing Street

George Osborne, the chancellor, will tell EU finance ministers in Luxembourg today that Britain does not intend playing a part in any new aid package for Greece.

By Szu Ping Chan and Andy Bloxham

12:16PM BST 20 Jun 2011

European financial markets tumbled on Monday morning as the postponement of a final decision on extending £10.6billion (€12bn) in emergency loans to Greece spooked investors across the world.

Read more at: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/financialcrisis/8586519/Financial-markets-slide-over-Greek-bailout-delays.html

June 21, 2011 Posted by | Fighting corruption internationally, Internationally significant information, Jane Burgermeister Report | Leave a comment

JANE BURGERMEISTER REPORT:’SENSIBLE GERMAN DEFENCE MINISTER KEEPS ARMY OUT OF LIBYA AND SYRIA ‘

SENSIBLE GERMAN DEFENCE MINISTER KEEPS ARMY OUT OF LIBYA AND SYRIA

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06/20/2011

SPIEGEL Interview with Defense Minister De Maizière

‘We Will Not Get Involved’ in Syria

Christian Thiel / DER SPIEGEL

German Defense Minister Thomas de Maizière in Berlin: “Significant progress must be made in Afghanistan.”

The US has been critical of Germany for not supporting NATO in the mission in Libya. SPIEGEL spoke to German Defense Minister Thomas de Maizière about Berlin’s skepticism of getting involved in Libya and Syria, and about the future of the NATO alliance.

SPIEGEL: Minister de Maizière, during his recent speech on the future of North Atlantic Treaty Organization, outgoing US Defense Secretary Robert Gates said that there are two categories of NATO partners: those who fight and those who dig wells. Which category is Germany in?

Thomas De Maizière: In Afghanistan, we’re demonstrating that the Bundeswehr (eds. note: the German military) is a fighting army whenever it has to be.

SPIEGEL: When it comes to NATO’s mission in Libya, Gates recently said that Germany, among others, wasn’t doing enough. What is your response?

De Maizière: Our decision to not participate in the military part of the Libya mission was based on carefully considered reasons. It remains correct. But that doesn’t put us in the category of mere well-diggers, as you put it.

SPIEGEL: Have you no bad conscience at all, given that your NATO partners in Libya are running out of steam and munitions?

De Maizière: The Americans did ask us for military assistance again at the most recent NATO meeting. We turned them down. But we have made things easier for the alliance by allowing German AWACS planes to participate in the mission in Afghanistan. And there’s one thing I’d like to add: When you start something, you of course always have to know how long you can keep it up.

SPIEGEL: On the eve of the first NATO airstrikes, you said on German public broadcaster ZDF: “Could the fact that we are suddenly intervening now have something to do with oil? We can’t get rid of all the dictators in the world with an international military mission.” Would you still say the same thing?

De Maizière: Yes. The “responsibility to protect” a country’s civilian population if its government violates human rights is firmly anchored in international law. But does that mean we are allowed to intervene? Or does that mean we’re actually required to? I believe that each military operation must be analyzed to determine whether its goals can be achieved with appropriate means and within an appropriate time frame as well as how one gets out at the end. Every one.

SPIEGEL: You are dodging the question. You have insinuated that Germany’s NATO allies are only intervening in Libya because of oil.

De Maizière: No, I wasn’t insinuating that at all. I strictly formulated that as a hypothetical.

SPIEGEL: But your formulation still implies it.

De Maizière: During the interview, I was pointing out that there have to be criteria for each and every decision about humanitarian intervention — even if that presents me with a number of dilemmas. If I say yes once, then I’ll have to justify why I say no the next time. Refraining from action is also a decision. One must make a decision, but one can’t expect that — no matter what the decision is — that one can always emerge from this kind of matter with clean hands. I have to live with that.

 

http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/0,1518,769339,00.html

 

June 21, 2011 Posted by | Fighting corruption internationally, Internationally significant information, Jane Burgermeister Report | Leave a comment

Does John Key stand to personally profit from open-cast coal mining in NZ?

www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/5171922/Pike-River-mine-would-be-illegal-in-Australia-Key

Pike River mine ‘would be illegal in Australia’ – Key

KATE CHAPMAN LATEST:

Prime Minister John Key has defended his claims that the Pike River coal mine would be illegal in Australia.

The comment has sparked a backlash from Labour leader Phil Goff who has described it as ”an unbelievable about-face”.

The Australian newspaper reported that Key had yesterday “vowed that there would be changes to mining safety laws”.

He told the newspaper the Pike River mine, which was a single-entry uphill mine, “couldn’t have been constructed in Australia” because it would have been “illegal”.

“There will be changes in New Zealand,” Key said.

This afternoon, Key said there was a difference between construction and safety standards.

The way the mine was consented in New Zealand was probably legal here but that was for the Royal Commission of Inquiry to decide.

“It’s quite true that from a construction perspective that mine would not be consented in Australia and was consented in New Zealand. From a safety standard perspective that’s a matter for the Royal Commission to tell us.”

Key said to the best of his knowledge mines here were as safe as those in Australia.

The EPMU has said the law should be changed now if New Zealand mines were not as safe as they could be. Key said there were no current applications for consent for mines.

“We did do a review of mines in the end the Royal Commission will come back.”

In his interview with the Australian, Key repeated comments to New Zealand media that a full response on mining safety would have to wait until the conclusion of the Royal Commission into the Pike River mine disaster, which killed 29 men in November last year.

But, in an apparent departure from his comments at the time of the disaster, Key conceded that the mine could not have been operational in Australia.

In November last year, however, he said:

“I have no reason to believe that New Zealand safety standards are any less than Australia’s.”

Key has this afternoon landed in Wellington after a short trip to Canberra and Sydney. He will face questions over the comments when Parliament sits this afternoon.

Already, Goff has said the “sudden change in his position” is “quite incredible”. “Just a month ago he publicly condemned a union representative for questioning safety at the mine, accusing her of being ‘churlish and insensitive’,”

Goff said. “He also said it was ‘dangerous’ to raise concerns about safety issues when the Royal Commission of Inquiry was still under way.

Yet he is now making similar claims himself while the Commission is still under way.

” If there was any new evidence about serious safety issues in New Zealand’s mines, there should be immediate action to address those concerns, Goff said.

The Royal Commission is currently receiving written submissions and open hearings will recommence in July. ____________________________________________________________

Seen the Sunday Programme on Pike River Mine?

tvnz.co.nz/sunday-news/disturbing-questions-pike-river-mine-part-1-15-04-video-4222074

tvnz.co.nz/sunday-news/disturbing-questions-pike-river-mine-part-2-8-34-video-4222107

Hmmmm…….. seems the Pike River Mine ‘whistleblower’ was correct about safety concerns

– what else …………….?

www.scribd.com/doc/47745564/Murder-at-Pike-River-Mine-SECOND-EDITION-With-Postscript

Check out Chapter 9, pg 38,

“SECRET PLAN TO OPEN UP PARKS TO OPEN CAST MINING: BATHURST RESOURCES & L&M COAL”

Check out Bathurst Resources Ltd, the company which is currently applying for a resource consent for open-cast coal mining in Buller:

See ‘Resource Consent Process’ 7 June 2011

“Buller Coal Resource Consent Application Public Hearing Commences”

www.bathurstresources.com/Investor-Information/Announcements/2011-ASX-Announcements

Who is a substantial shareholder in Bathurst Resources Ltd?

See April 29 2011 ‘Changes in substantial ownership’

The Bank of America has voting power of 7.50% in Bathurst Resources Ltd.

Remember? John Key is a shareholder in the Bank of America.

www.parliament.nz/en-NZ/MPP/MPs/FinInterests/8/c/3/00CLOOCMPPFinInterests20101-Register-of-Pecuniary-Interests-of-Members.htm          (See pg 36)

So – would John Key stand to personally profit from open cast coal-mining in the West Coast, given his shareholding in the Bank of America?

Penny Bright

waterpressure.wordpress.com

June 21, 2011 Posted by | Fighting corruption in NZ, Fighting corruption internationally, Internationally significant information | Leave a comment